Uncategorized

What is low vision?

I have read two definitions:

  • “Low vision is the term used to refer to a visual impairment that is not correctable through surgery, pharmaceuticals, glasses or contact lenses. It is often characterised by partial sight, such as blurred vision, blind spots or tunnel vision. Low vision can impact people of all ages, but is primarily associated with older adults.”and,
  • “Low vision is ‘not enough vision to do whatever it is you need to do’, which can vary from person to person”.

low-vision-photo

Your vision can deteriorate with age; however, vision loss does not have to be an accepted part of growing old. A yearly eye examination by an optometrist or vision specialist can identify potential vision problems before they occur. In my case a simple trip to the optometrist to organise a new pair of reading glasses revealed the fact I have Age Related Macular Degeneration. I still needed the new reading glasses, and I was given a referral to an eye specialist who is now treating my macular disease.

Because of this early diagnosis the specialist has told me “I will have very useful vision for a long time”. I am now 63 and a bit so ‘a long time’ sounds like very good news to me.
Some of the more common causes of low vision include:

Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD): AMD is the leading cause of vision loss, for example in the USA it accounts for nearly 50% of all low vision cases. It is caused when the macular breaks down which can cause the loss of central vision, please see this link for more information about AMD.

Glaucoma: is the second major cause of low vision and it can occur without warning. For more info about glaucoma please use this link.

Diabetic Retinopathy: Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye. It is a major cause of blindness and it is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes.

Cataracts: Most of the eye’s lens is made of water and protein, and the protein is arranged in an exact way to keep the lens clear. As we grow older some of the protein may clump together creating a cataract. Over time, it may grow larger and cloud more of the lens, making it harder to see.

Vision is also an important factor in maintaining balance. Since 2011 In the USA the rate of life-threatening injuries after a fall since has nearly doubled when compared to the previous decade.

It is a shock when you discover your vision loss cannot be reversed, however please remember it can be treated. So, organise the professional help that will provide you with the strategies and treatments to keep you active and safe. Also, why not have a look at the low vision aids we have created to assist in some of your most common daily activities, you will find everything you need here: www.ezidlabels.com.

myanmar-756581_1280

by John Owens – john@ezidlabels.comwww.ezidlabels.com

 

What is Glaucoma?

glaucoma-piocture-1

Glaucoma is a complicated disease in which the optic nerve at the back of the eye is damaged which leads to progressive, irreversible vision loss. Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness.

There are two main types of glaucoma: primary open angle glaucoma and acute angle closure glaucoma.

The most common form is primary open angle glaucoma. This is often associated with an increase in eye pressure. Eye pressure refers to the tissue pressure within the human eye and is typically caused by the continual drainage and production of aqueous humour.

glaucoma-diagram

The aqueous humour is the watery fluid between the cornea and the lens. It maintains the pressure needed to inflate the eye and provides nutrition for the central cornea and lens as they do not have their own blood supply. It circulates from behind the iris into drainage channels between the iris and the cornea. If it cannot drain away correctly, then there can be a fluid build-up leading to a rise in eye pressure and ultimately damage to the optic nerve.

Eye pressure is usually shown as millimetres of mercury (mm Hg). The standard eye pressure should measure less than 21 mm Hg. Ocular hypertension occurs when the eye pressure increases. Vision damage occurs very slowly and the first signs may be the loss of some parts of the visual field, most commonly the peripheral, or side vision.

Acute angle closure glaucoma occurs when the drainage system becomes completely blocked and the fluid pressure rises quickly as more fluid continues to be made. The usual symptoms are sudden and severe eye pain, a red eye and blurred, haloed or decreased vision. The sufferer may feel sick and vomit and it can rapidly lead to blindness in the affected eye if not treated promptly.

Glaucoma can affect young children also; it is called congenital, paediatric or infantile glaucoma. It is usually diagnosed within the first year of life. Symptoms include enlarged eyes, cloudiness of the cornea and sensitivity to light.

Glaucoma can be treated with eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. All are intended to decrease eye pressure and, thereby, protect the optic nerve. The goal of any treatment is to prevent loss of vision, as vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible. The good news is that glaucoma can be managed if detected early, and with medical and/or surgical treatment, most people with glaucoma will not lose their sight.

glaucoma-picture-2

John Owens – john@ezidlabels.com   www.ezidlabels.com