Who Created The Eye Test Chart?

The eye test chart was designed by Herman Snellen (1834 – 1908) in 1862. Herman was a Dutch ophthalmologist and he developed the chart as an aid to measure an individual’s vision.

Snellen earned his medical degree at Utrecht University in the Netherlands in 1858. He specialised in ophthalmology after completing his degree and in 1877 was appointed a professor of ophthalmology at the University. His research was based on causes of low vision including glaucoma and astigmatism (a fault in the shape of the eye’s lens).

Other versions of eye test charts had been developed previously however these charts were never standardised. They used fonts of different sizes and shapes and did not necessarily provide an accurate assessment of a person’s real vision.

The British Army placed a large order for the Snellen chart in 1863, and from there it quickly became the global standard for almost 100 years. It is also the standard on which all more recent eye test chart systems are based.

Snellens’ innovation was to use specially designed characters, known as optotypes, instead of an existing, standard font. The Snellen optotype was based on a 5 x 5 grid and this grid was used to create a limited character set of 9 – 10 letters. The lines were a standard thickness and letters were all the same shape.

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This allowed the chart to be reproduced easily and provide accurate results wherever it was used.

The Snellen chart normally includes eleven lines of block letters. The first line comprises a single large letter, usually the letter E. Each of the following lines have increasing numbers of letters, each progressively smaller in size.

The Snellen eye test determines the visual acuity (clarity of vision) of an individual based on which is the smallest row of letters they can read.

With the traditional Snellen eye chart, the individual who can read the row of letters fourth from the bottom of the chart at 20 feet has 20/20 vision. The next three lines provide a measurement of 20/15, 20/10 and 20/5 vision. Not many individuals have 20/10 or better however many animals do, especially birds of prey, which may have an acuity of 20/5 or even better.

Testing with the Snellen eye chart helps reveal visual problems and symptoms of other medical conditions. However it is only one component of a complete eye examination.

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Images courtesy Wikipedia

by John Owens – john@ezidlabels.com   – www.ezidlabels.com

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